Viral Mythology: How the Truth of the Ancients was Encoded…

January 14, 2014

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How Secret Information and Scientific Knowledge “Goes Viral” in Ancient Myth and Folklore

In their new book, Viral Mythology, popular scholars and prolific authors Marie D. Jones and Larry Flaxman reveal the fascinating phenomenon of “archeoenigmas,” which are ancient images, stories and symbols that impart metaphysical truths and scientific information. Hidden within the art, the song, the texts and the built structures of ancient times is a vast treasure chest of wisdom that is as relevant today as it was eons ago.

Viral Mythology: How the Truth of the Ancients was Encoded and Passed Down through Legend, Art, and Architecture

by Marie Jones, Larry Flaxman

 “[There is] a growing need to further understand the significance of ancient symbolism as it continues to accompany us in these modern times. This symbolism gets to the core of what makes us human… and [plays] an integral part in the creation, development, and sustainment of our overall collective psyche.”   –John Richard Ward, coauthor of The Exodus Reality

Behind every myth, fairy tale, and legend–hidden within the art, song, and structures of ancient times–is an encoded layer of wisdom, science, and truth passed down throughout history. This book will examine how information went “viral” long before the Internet, and served as the foundation for mythology, sacred architecture, and symbolic imagery throughout the ancient world.

Viral Mythology reveals:

  • How primitive and ancient cultures conveyed cutting-edge scientific knowledge in their origin stories and myths
  • Why esoteric knowledge was hidden in symbols, art, and architecture during times of religious oppression and persecution
  • How stories, songs, and art served to describe actual historical events
  • Why diverse civilizations told the same stories and created the same art with common themes and symbols, despite no apparent communication

    From the great myths of the Greek, Roman, and Norse to the texts of the world’s major religions, from folklore and fairy tales of old to sacred edifices and monuments, from cave paintings to the mysterious symbology of the Tarot, Viral Mythology uncovers the information highway of the past, and explores how it affects the more modern methods of communication today.

    It all began once upon a time….

The Search for Hidden Truth In Story, Symbol and Form 

An Article by Marie D. Jones and Larry Flaxman

Behind every origin story of ancient cultures and civilizations…behind every myth, every fairly tale and folklore and every religious text is an underlying layer of truth that describes the scientific knowledge and spiritual wisdom of the time. These amazing stories and myths may also hold a storehouse of hidden knowledge that matches today’s most cutting edge theories and discoveries. To those that came before us, where language was in its infancy and lacked today’s sophistication, the facts were, in fact, the story, and somehow, that story had to be considered important enough to go “viral” and spread from one culture to the next.

From the implicate and secret knowledge embedded in fairy tales, folklore and cosmogenesis stories, to the amazing science behind myth and religious writings from all over the world, what we have come to know as story contains more fact, more information, than we ever imagined. But that fact is often hidden behind a beginning, middle and an end, with a message, or a theme…a story meant to impart information even as it entertains or continues a heritage and legacy of a people from generation to generation.

Our ancient religious texts, myths and folklore show how even the most primitive cultures understood the world around them far more than we give them credit for, and may have actually contained common beliefs, concepts and understandings of the times. These are examples of “monomyth,” the common structures found in all myth and ancient stories. These common elements are surprising when we consider that people in those days had no simple means of spreading ideas.

How, then, did such distant cultures share so many similar ideas?
Aside from common themes, we also must ask, how did they know what they knew?
Historians, anthropologists and archeologists all stand in awe of the sophistication of various monuments built around celestial activities our primitive ancestors could not have known about…or could they?

Scientists are amazed at the intricate knowledge our ancestors had, made evident in their drawings, maps, writings and oral traditions, of the natural world they existed in, long before computers and Google and wikis were invented. 

We still struggle to understand how ancient cultures could achieve what they did minus the advances we take for granted.

But the ancients didn’t just communicate their knowledge and information via the stories they told. They also utilized art and architecture, ripe with intriguing common themes and elements, motifs and iconography and symbolism. Information can come to us in pictures, as rock and cave art of our primitive ancestors tell of their close connection with nature and natural cycles and phenomena, and even potentially supernatural phenomena. Across the globe, both primitive and ancient art and architecture often present elements so similar to one another, it suggests that certain themes were archetypal to the entirety of humanity. Why did so many diverse civilizations, separated by thousands of miles, with no real means or methods of communication, all use the same symbolic imagery, with only slight regionally influenced variations? Was there some outside influence spreading these common themes, or were these cultures tapping into a field of ideas and information that existed in the collective subconscious?

The highly popular “ancient astronaut theory” is one way we attempt to explain the leaps in knowledge, as well as how that knowledge spread over large distances so quickly.

Other theories include the science of memetics; the field/Grid theory of an invisible and implicate clearinghouse of information available to everyone at any time; and even good old word of mouth! All of these theories have validity and merit, and might help us better understand what our ancestors wanted to tell us, including those things we continue to argue, even kill each other, over, such as religious
beliefs, traditions and historical events.

How information spread and went “viral” long before we possessed cell phones and social networking and the Internet speaks volumes about how communication itself evolved in ancient times, and what was important enough for them to communicate in the first place. Whether their modus operandi was fairy tales or folk legends, myth or religious parable, rock art or vase paintings, mosaic tile floors or lavish cathedrals built to precise sacred geometric measurements, pyramids or stone henges, or those strange objects out of time and place we call “archeoenigmas,” our ancient ancestors communicate with us, today, in so many ways. It is up to us, though, to correctly interpret their “viral mythology” and what it meant to them, as well as what they hope it will mean to us.
What it all comes down to, though, is about the way our ancestors often communicated information by encoding and embedding it in the creativity, art, architecture and the imagination of the times, out of direct sight of those who might not want that truth revealed. Even as we look back into the past, we see that viral mythology is also about how the stories we tell today, and the art and architecture we imagine and build into form, will embed the information we want to communicate to future generations, and create and shape our future in the same manner. The tales we tell today become the viral mythology of tomorrow. What are we leaving behind and what will it say about who we were and what was important to us? What will future descendants think of us when, one day on an archeological dig, they find our cell phones, our computers, our toys and comic books and temples and mosques and churches, our television shows and movies, our novels and plastic water bottles and houses and mansions and tent cities and trash dumps and ghettos, our jewelry and tattoos and texts and emails and pet clothing… 

It all starts with “In the beginning…” “Once upon a time…” “Long ago and far away…” and “Every picture tells a story…”

© Marie D. Jones and Larry Flaxman.

Jones and Flaxman are the authors of Viral Mythology: How the Truth of the Ancients Was Encoded and Passed Down through Legend, Art, and Architecture published by New Page. ISBN: 978-1-60163-295-1 List Price: US $15.99.

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Book Summary

Viral Mythology by Marie D. Jones and Larry Flaxman

LONG BEFORE we had the Internet, YouTube and Facebook, ideas and knowledge went viral through storytelling, the use of art, and architecture. Long before we had the ability to fire off a text via cell phone, or email a news item and watch it go “viral” across the globe in a matter of minutes, our ancient ancestors had their own ways of encoding and transmitting important information that would stand the test of time.

Viral Mythology explores how ancient civilizations and cultures relied on various means of spreading information within the context of their stories, oral traditions, religious texts, cave and rock art, pottery, paintings and even their monuments, edifices and holy and sacred sites.

Today, we are left with the task of looking back in time to see just what was important to the cultures of the past, and how they influence our understanding of who we are, where we came from, and what our place may be in the world. By examining the origin stories, myths and even fairy tales of the past, we come to find deep truths embedded within the fantastical. By looking at the images and symbols etched into stone and on cave walls, and the more sophisticated art of later eras, we come to understand what our ancestors revered and worshipped. By exploring the ruins of pyramids, henges, monuments, temples and churches of old, we open the door to discover what our ancestors believed in and how they viewed their place in the cosmos.

Viral Mythology speaks to our present, and our future, by looking at what information was deemed important enough to be passed down to our generations, to be discovered and uncovered in the layers of earth and history. It also speaks to the scientific understanding of our ancestors, in clues embedded in their stories and art and buildings that allow us to see how close they lived with the natural world, and how well they understood its inner workings, even if they lacked the scientific acumen to describe it that we have today.

We can come to fully understand who we are by looking at how ideas and information goes viral today, and apply it to the past, to realize that ideas and knowledge always find a way to stand up to time. The Viral Mythology of the past is our present, and we are now creating the Viral Mythology that will define us to future generations.

ViralMythology_book 

{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

R?zvan Andrei Ionescu January 18, 2014 at 9:31 pm

Really? Reading the comments I can see a one “grown-up” complaining about a childish way to look at things.
Another point of view, I understand, is the depressing “corporatized, consumerized existence” – as someone mentioned.

Well, I wonder if you have watched children.
A child’s first steps. And the many times he will fall, then cry, then try again. After a couple of months a year, the child will be able to walk. Do you remember your first steps? Your parents haven’t told you “bedtime stories” aka “myths”.

The first step to get out of your state of depression and criticism will be to start looking at life through the eyes of a child. If you are not happy with your life make a change. Acting like a victim of the system will not make it easier for you to cope, or to live life.

I find the book more then welcome in this “rational and intellectualized” world.

Reply

Scordra January 17, 2014 at 6:46 pm

“This book will examine how information went “viral” long before the Internet, and served as the foundation for mythology, sacred architecture, and symbolic imagery throughout the ancient world.”

If we stick to this it becomes basically irrelevant what information (myth and legend) is true or untrue. I’m certainly not going to pick apart which myths and legends have truths or applications for me and my life. Even if in disagreement, I can appreciate their foundation and origin. The point of this book seems to be viral mythology and how it was executed long ago, prior to today’s technology. Have people covered esoteric knowledge, ancient symbols, and historical debates before? Sure! Is it an approach in hindsight? Quite possibly, but I think this will be a great read and shed some new ideas as well. Namaste.

Reply

Mark January 17, 2014 at 5:21 am

Judging from the looks of things, myths haven’t helped all that much. Oh we have them but never adhered to their messages. Oh that’s it.

A) The masses have been deceived and exploited for eons via a carefully constructed social engineering agenda. Nothing can be correctly addressed until this issue is acknowledged. It’s been a rigged game (doing the will of others).

B) Take a myth. Now do some comparative analysis. 100 myths, 100 interpretations. May be an exaggeration but not all that much and I’ve about had it with all these variants on say the bible.

C) Seems many myths state the obvious or rather established dynamics and cycles. In essence, some are akin to claiming such amazing things as, “When the sun comes up, it is day time.”

D) Efficacy again. Collect all the great myths and process them. Now try and build your desk top free energy device or star gate or whatever they allude to. Do black op scientists refer to any of these myths?

E) Myth MAKING goes on all the time.

F) Let’s see. Did Chinese Traditional Medicine or Ayurveda etc etc base their systems more on myth or observation?

G) Religious Myth… this ain’t too productive – unless perhaps you need solace and meaning via (what I call) sop literature. Now what is mainstream religion is essence about anyway!? Solar Myths. Thus, “When the sun comes up it is day time.” In any case, it’s all about belief there and this isn’t the way unless that belief happens to reflect reality.

H) Fukushima fallout (coming to a town near you eventually) doesn’t give a hoot about any frigging myths.

I) Jung, Freud and co. They weren’t breaking new ground by any means. They put modern labels on old observations.

J) Although NLP may be overrated, along with some other contemporary approaches, there are other effective methods for healing deep issues. These formulas, addressing deep psyche in many cases (addressed by so many myths), didn’t rely on myths.

K) After 20 years of reading on myths and all things similar it seems to me the only folks who tangibly benefit by myth and magic are authors who simply rehash all this stuff yet again.

I could go on. But will offer the other hand. Myth and magic(K) has helped me endure my corporatized, consumerized, pc’ized, etc’ized existence. Myths alluding to something more. But you don’t need a myth to tell you there’s a difference twixt the (say) sun and moon.

But what’s life without a mystery? That could be all it is. If we knew everything…

Someone mentioned Creation Myth. ow this may be something. It could be that ALL subsequent myth making were based on those first Creation Myths!! Total rehash, tweaking and elaboration.

But let’s now Compare creation myths… I dare ya. Well, we can find some corroboration actually. Many of the most general precepts like this underlying Oneness. Oh that helps.

Next!

Reply

Ivar Nielsen January 16, 2014 at 5:16 am

@William John Meegan,
You wrote:
“Mythology is not to be responded to “through emotional, psychological responses”: that is a child way of looking at mythology and I agree that modernity is in an infantile state of knowing anything concerning what humanity is all about. Mythology is a purely ‘objective’ and ‘scientific’ system of thought, which uses both ‘word and image’ to write the highly sophisticated esoteric science into the world’s literature, artworks and monuments”.

AD: I totally agree in this. Ancient Myths speaks of real cosmological, ecological and sociological knowledge as these matters are conditioned be the very genuine and non-emotional creative forces.

Best Wishes
Ivar Nielsen
http://www.native-science.net

Reply

Ivar Nielsen January 16, 2014 at 5:09 am

Thanks a lot for this introduction :-)
Quote:
“Today, we are left with the task of looking back in time to see just what was important to the cultures of the past, and how they influence our understanding of who we are, where we came from, and what our place may be in the world. By examining the origin stories, myths and even fairy tales of the past, we come to find deep truths embedded within the fantastical. By looking at the images and symbols etched into stone and on cave walls, and the more sophisticated art of later eras, we come to understand what our ancestors revered and worshipped. By exploring the ruins of pyramids, henges, monuments, temples and churches of old, we open the door to discover what our ancestors believed in and how they viewed their place in the cosmos”.

AD: Well right. But the only way this common knowledge can occur on global scale in ancient times, is for humans all over the world to watch the seasons of the Earth and the celestial motions of the stars and of the seemingly revolving Milky Way contours which is closely connected to the Stories of Creation – all a part of the physical observations (the outer way) which of course shal be connected to and combined with the spiritual observations from dreams and visions of the cosmos (the inner way).
Best Wishes
Ivar Nielsen
http://www.native-science.net

Reply

William John Meegan January 16, 2014 at 1:03 am

Both Maria Jones and Larry Flaxman are far from knowing what mythology is about. I went on Amazon.com and read the Foreword and the Prologue to this book and as I suspected from the above article these authors know nothing about mythology.

It is inconceivable that an intelligent man and woman would conspire to write the following statement, in their prologue, if they had any sense, whatsoever, of what mythology was about.

“The symbols we find ourselves surrounded by are used as tools of interaction with one another on a non-verbal level, which requires no personal conscious thought process. Our conditioned mindsets interprets the symbolism on an individual basis through a series of stages of emotional, psychological responses.”

Ms Jones is a prolific writer and Mr. Flaxman is allegedly a paranormal expert. If this is their mindset on the works of antiquity I advise the readers to save their money and go elsewhere to learn about the mythologies of antiquity.

Jones and Flaxman swill out the same old, same old rhetoric as to “what must have been” basically theorizing and hypothesizing on how humanity crawled out of the caves and struggled up the ladder of civilization. I, personally, would not go near that with a ten-foot pole because man is a spiritual psychic being not a materialistic one.

Mythology is not to be responded to “through emotional, psychological responses”: that is a child way of looking at mythology and I agree that modernity is in an infantile state of knowing anything concerning what humanity is all about. Mythology is a purely ‘objective’ and ‘scientific’ system of thought, which uses both ‘word and image’ to write the highly sophisticated esoteric science into the world’s literature, artworks and monuments.

If the reader does not use “conscious thought” to cull out from the mythologies of the world its hidden Esoteric knowledge he or she is not going to get anywhere. Osmosis is not the bedrock of the human intellect as Jones and Flaxman seem to infer with the above statement.

The ancients were not using mythology “as tools of interaction with one another on a non-verbal level”. That is about as asinine as one can get when speaking about mythology. Mythology was written for the sole purpose of educating the individual about his soul. Mythology is all about man psyche’s interaction with the divine powers that be. In order for the individual to understand man’s relationship to God he has to know about the process of his own psyche.

It boggles my mind how modernity could look at the leavings of antiquity and interpret the ancients as ignorant barbarians. I look at modernity’s corporate executives and the politicians of the world as pure unadulterated savages.

Until academia understands that all of antiquity – right up to the age of enlightenment – is nothing more then a mythological library that needs to be interpreted (antiquity is not actual history) they will never get a sense of what mythology is about. In fact the future will see that tsunami of esoteric mythology overtaking own times as if it was nothing more then allegorical story and in every sense it is.

I can actually point to a number of incidences that are allegedly true that took place in the American Civil War, which have been mythologized into biblical mythological stories. Yet, if you hear about them you would not make the connections.
1) The date that the Emancipation Proclamation was signed by Abraham Lincoln is a direct reference to the story of Abram/Abraham (in the bible) life. This date also has a direct reference to the birth of Jesus Christ and the coming of the Magi. This date also has a direct reference to the Zodiac/Calendar year created by both Julius and Augustus Caesars. In fact this date as a direct reference to the first word of Genesis and the writing of the entire Judeao Christian scriptures
2) The amount of deaths in both the Yankees (Federal Army) and Rebels (Confederacy) camps are analogous to the Ten Commandments.

Do you see how inane and insane mythology is to the mind of modernity that knows nothing of mythology? If I can say these things about these actual American Civil War events and know of what I speak of, what does that tell the reader about modernity’s present understanding of mythology???…

It say that modernity has not even taken the first step in the journey of thousand miles.

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